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Back after a short vacation to Melbourne to see Sir Paul McCartney in concert. A large load of design related links to start of the working week (obligatory cat video back next week!)

Not my sort of music, but the Wu Tang Clan have certainly paid a lot of attention to their visual image over the years.

I’ve sometimes thought of starting my own Kickstarter project over the years )I’ve certainly funded my fair share of them), here’s some tips on funding your own Kickstarter campaign.

The Smudge reminds me of the type of publications produced by the British underground press in the 1960s. I’ve just purchased a couple of back issues and I’m really looking forward to reading them.

Speaking of the British underground press of the 1960s, this new book purports to include the cover of every British underground paper that launched in the sixties. I may have to purchase my own copy when finances allow after the Christmas season.

With each issue based around a single object, MacGuffin magazine is a platform for fans of inspiring, personal, unexpected, highly familiar or utterly disregarded things. It’s a beautifully designed magazine and weighing in at a hefty 220 pages, a thorough read. The latest issues is on ‘sinks’.

Looking to donate some money in this season of giving? Women Who Code and Design That Matters may be a good place to park some cash if you are in a charitable mood.

The Time person(s) of the year are the silence breakers. Thank God it’s not D2S.

Would you kill to work at one of these companies? (I might come close if Adult Swim offered). Interesting that The New York Times is one of the choices too.

Designer Dave Sedgwick discusses how to push a brief.

I’ve been known to take a Skillshare class or two. This one on The Art of the Story: Creating Visual Narratives by Debbie Millman looks fantastic (it features Paul Sahre as an added bonus!)

Legendary logo designer Ivan Chermayeff has died.

I really like these ceramic and porcelain ghosts.

What did graphic design look like in the medieval period? A question that I’m sure has been on all our minds at one point.

Lots of people reflecting on 2017 online at the moment. This is a pretty good list of what one person learned throughout the year.

Ultraviolet is the Pantone colour of the year.

 

If it’s links you want, then it’s links we’ve got. Start your working week on an inspirational and aspirational note with some great design articles to brighten the Monday morning blues.

After a tough week I can relate (I am a snowflake too). On creativity and depression – more often than not they go hand in hand unfortunately.

Sometimes just seeing some fantastic design work can brighten your day. In that regard, I really like this book cover by Erik Carter.

I like looking at some fancy, schmancy beautifully designed websites too!

I seem to remember these guys being ‘kind of a big deal’ in the ’90s. Great to see that Why Not Associates are still kicking along at 30 years strong.

The history of the involvement of women in the growth of graphic design has been sorely lacking, luckily that is slowly beginning to change with the help of articles like this.

The Casual Optimist delivers the good stuff every 30 days with their review of Book Covers of the month.

King Gizzard and the Lizard Wizard don’t really produce my sort of music, but as far as pushing the creativity of their releases go, they are one of the most exciting musical groups around. Their latest album titled Polygondwanaland, (their fifth release this year alone!) is completely free to own, use and manipulate, including a toolkit of long-time collaborator Jason Galea’s artwork.

We should be encouraging diversity in the design industry. Here’s some ideas on how to do just that.

The Great Discontent has the best interviews with varied creative talent you will find anywhere. This article, with one of my personal design idols, Gail Bichler, is a prime example. Seriously, if you are of a creative persuasion, this site should be at the top of your favourites list.

Can logos become their own legends? The BBC thinks so!

I am a comic book nerd and I want to read these comics badly.

I am also a science nerd. If any of you are looking to buy me a Christmas present this year, I have a suggestion.

Sometimes it’s a good idea to step back and ask yourself some questions. These are some pretty good ones to consider!

The Rules of magazine design are changing it seems.

And on that note, digital is dying apparently. We told you so.

Why good design alone won’t attract millennials to your company. You need balloons as well don’t you know.

Sheila Levrant de Bretteville is an amazing graphic designer that enough people haven’t heard of.

There were some Australian Graphic design trophies awarded the other week. All the winners are up on the awards site now. Keep an eye out for my totally unbiased overview on Facing Sideways soon!

Ease into the start of the working week with some design food for thought and inspiration.

Vaughan Oliver is the designer behind the look of the classic 4AD music label, for artists such as The Pixies and This Mortal Coil. He has a Kickstarter campaign for a new book that you can donate to.

Stackmagzines.com has their finalists up for their annual magazine awards.

Pentagram partner and graphic designer Natasha Jen talks about her favourite and most challenging work.

IBM wants to create the Helvetica of the 21st century for some reason.

Oliver Jeffers is an an amazing talent across various creative disciplines. Here he talks about art, the universe and everything.

Ivy Ross is the Head of Design for Hardware at Google, here she discusses how human connection is essential to your bottom line.

Stefan Sagmeister will critique your design work on Instagram.

Ever wonder how other creatives ‘get-up-and-go’ in the mornings and wind down at the end of the day? Extraordinary Routines has got you covered.

There seems to be a recent influx of magazines covering issues of mental health and well-being, sign of the times or a passing fad?

The 1980s and 90s were the glory days of album cover design, with labels like 4AD, Stiff and Factory almost as famous for the designers they had creating those covers, as for the music itself. Mute also had an amazing visual vernacular, though one perhaps not so aligned with a singular designers vision. They have a book coming out looking back on those cover designs.

Does the price of entry for creatives impact the makeup of the industry?

Looking to balance you life a little more? Maybe The Swedish lifestyle trend Lagom is the answer.